Sports Summary

Rowing was included for the first time in the Paralympic program in 2008. Commonly known as adaptive rowing, it is open to people with a physical impairment or vision impairment in sweep rowing or sculling disciplines.

Links

Rowing Australia

FISA – World Rowing

International Paralympic Committee

Events & Disciplines

  • Single Scull (men’s and women’s events)
  • Double Sculls (mixed)
  • Coxed Four (mixed)

Classification

Who is eligible for Rowing? Athletes with a vision impairment or physical impairment.

 

Athletes with a vision impairment: PR3 (legs, trunk and arms).
Athletes with a physical impairment: PR3 (legs, trunk and arms), PR2 (trunk and arms) and PR1 (arms and shoulders).

  • Classification Information Sheet – Rowing PDF
  1. How do I get a classification?  
  2. Refer to the Rowing Australia website for information on obtaining a classification www.rowingaustralia.com.au/development/para-rowing/para-rowing-classification/.
  3. Athletes with a vision impairment should also refer to www.paralympic.org.au/vision-classification/.

Classification Masterlist: Rowing Australia manages the Australian Rowing Classification Masterlist. This list includes athletes who have been classified as per FISA Classification Rules or APC Classification Policy.

Rules & Equipment

The hull of the adaptive rowing boat is identical to able-bodied boats. Adaptive rowing boats are equipped with special seats, which vary according to the disability of the rower. To date, there are no other specifications on the seat apart from the following: the LTA4+ has a sliding seat; the other three boat classes have fixed seats. The TA 2x has a seat, which offers ‘complimentary support’. The AW1x and AM1x are equipped with a seat, which offers ‘ postural support’ to those individuals with compromised sitting balance (i.e. spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy). This ensures the upper body is supported and kept in a fixed position.

Smaller boats are equipped with buoyancy devices called pontoons, which act as stabaliser attached to the boats riggers, providing additional lateral balance.

Medal History

Year Gold Silver Bronze total
2012 0 1 0 1
2008 0 1 0 1

Events/Disciplines

  • Single Scull (men’s and women’s events)
  • Double Sculls (mixed)
  • Coxed Four (mixed)

Classification

Who is eligible for Rowing? Athletes with a vision impairment or physical impairment.

 

Athletes with a vision impairment: PR3 (legs, trunk and arms).
Athletes with a physical impairment: PR3 (legs, trunk and arms), PR2 (trunk and arms) and PR1 (arms and shoulders).

  • Classification Information Sheet – Rowing PDF
  1. How do I get a classification?  
  2. Refer to the Rowing Australia website for information on obtaining a classification www.rowingaustralia.com.au/development/para-rowing/para-rowing-classification/.
  3. Athletes with a vision impairment should also refer to www.paralympic.org.au/vision-classification/.

Classification Masterlist: Rowing Australia manages the Australian Rowing Classification Masterlist. This list includes athletes who have been classified as per FISA Classification Rules or APC Classification Policy.

Rules & Equipment

The hull of the adaptive rowing boat is identical to able-bodied boats. Adaptive rowing boats are equipped with special seats, which vary according to the disability of the rower. To date, there are no other specifications on the seat apart from the following: the LTA4+ has a sliding seat; the other three boat classes have fixed seats. The TA 2x has a seat, which offers ‘complimentary support’. The AW1x and AM1x are equipped with a seat, which offers ‘ postural support’ to those individuals with compromised sitting balance (i.e. spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy). This ensures the upper body is supported and kept in a fixed position.

Smaller boats are equipped with buoyancy devices called pontoons, which act as stabaliser attached to the boats riggers, providing additional lateral balance.

Medal History

Year Gold Silver Bronze total
2012 0 1 0 1
2008 0 1 0 1