Sports Summary

Wheelchair rugby is an intense, physical team sport for male and female athletes with an impairment in both upper and lower limbs. The sport can be very physical as athletes attempt to carry the ball over the opponent’s goal line.

The four players on the court cannot exceed a combined total of 8 points. A volleyball is used and it can be carried, dribbled, or passed in any way except by kicking. The ball must be bounced at least once every 10 seconds and rugby is played in eight-minute quarters.

The players are classified according to their level of functional ability and are assigned a point value from 0.5 to 3.5 points – the higher the points, the more functional ability the athletes have.

Links

International Wheelchair Rugby Federation

International Paralympic Committee

Events & Disciplines

Eight-team tournament (mixed – males and females): teams are drawn into two pools and the two highest placed teams in each group progress to the semi-finals

 

Classification

Who is eligible for Wheelchair Rugby? Athletes with a physical impairment  that affects all four limbs, such as spinal cord injury (quadriplegia), limb loss in both arms and legs, or an equivalent impairment.

What are the classes? Players are classified into one of seven classes ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 points.

How do I get a classification? Request a classification using the Get Classified form.

Rules & Equipment

Court

Wheelchair rugby is played indoors on a regulation-sized basketball court. The basketball key area is replaced by a wheelchair rugby key 8 metres wide and 1.75 metres deep. The part of the end line within the key is called the goal line, and it is marked with one pylon at each end.

Ball

An official size and weight volleyball is used for play. The ball must weight 280 grams and be white in colour.

Wheelchairs

As a contact sport, wheelchair rugby places high demands on players’ wheelchairs. They must be lightweight and easy to manoeuvre while still being strong enough to protect the players and withstand the frequent intense collisions. Wheelchair rugby chairs have several unique features including bumpers at the front and wings to protect the side area. Spoke protectors and anti-tip devices are mandatory. All wheelchairs must meet IWRF regulations.

Gloves

Athletes may wear gloves to improve their grip on the ball.

Medal History

Year Gold Silver Bronze total
2012 1 0 0 1
2008 0 1 0 1
2000 0 1 0 1
Ryley Batt

Ryley Batt

Wheelchair Rugby

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Chris Bond

Chris Bond

Wheelchair Rugby

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Cameron Carr

Cameron Carr

Wheelchair Rugby

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Andrew Edmondson

Andrew Edmondson

Wheelchair Rugby

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Nazim Erdem

Nazim Erdem

Wheelchair Rugby

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Ben Fawcett

Ben Fawcett

Wheelchair Rugby

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Andrew Harrison

Andrew Harrison

Wheelchair Rugby

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Josh Hose

Josh Hose

Wheelchair Rugby

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Jason Lees

Jason Lees

Wheelchair Rugby

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Matt Lewis

Matt Lewis

Wheelchair Rugby

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Ryan Scott

Ryan Scott

Wheelchair Rugby

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Jayden Warn

Jayden Warn

Wheelchair Rugby

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Meet the 2016 Paralympic Wheelchair Rugby Team

For further information about this sport and how to get involved please contact the National or your State Federation below

Disability Sports Australia
sports.org.au

Australian Paralympic Committee
paralympic.org.au

NSW – Wheelchair Sports NSW
wsnsw.org.au

Queensland – Sporting Wheelies & Disabled Association
sportingwheelies.org.au

South Australia – Disability Recreation & Sports SA
drssa.org.au

Victoria – Disability Sport & Recreation Victoria
dsr.org.au

Western Australia – Wheelchair Sports Association WA
wheelchairsportswa.org.au